Kitchen and bathroom faucets are one of the most common upgrades during a remodeling project. In fact, 81% of renovating homeowners upgrade their kitchen faucet, while 88% upgrade their bathroom faucet. With such high demand, manufacturers respond every year with new faucet styles, finishes and features to align with current trends. And many of those manufacturers use the Kitchen & Bath Industry Show to launch their new faucet collections.
 
Kitchen


1. Pull-Down Designs

You’d be hard pressed to find a kitchen faucet these days without a pull-down function. This feature allows homeowners to extend the spray nozzle to rinse vegetables, fill pots and clean the sink basin.

Many manufacturers are updating existing collections and launching new ones that include a pull-down function in a range of styles.

Delta debuted its Monrovia collection, shown here. It’s a soft contemporary pull-down style that comes in four finishes. There’s also an add-on protective coat, called Lumicoat, that resists stains and mineral buildup.

Delta’s new Westville pull-down features a transitional design and a magnetic docking station for the nozzle.
 
Peerless is launching its Flute collection in May 2022. The affordable, transitional-style line will include a nozzle with a rinse function that features two fan-like sprays.
 
 
Bocchi debuted its Lugano faucet, shown here in a matte gold finish, with a sleek contemporary design that blurs the lines between spout and nozzle.
 
2. Commercial Style


This style of faucet, often seen in commercial restaurant kitchens, is experiencing a bit of a renaissance. Several manufacturers launched or expanded commercial-style designs this year. It’s part of a broader trend emerging post-pandemic: a back-to-basics strategy that seeks to modernize industrial-style plumbing fixtures.

Moen launched a collection of what it calls spring galley faucets in three styles. The Belfield, shown here in a matte black finish, is a compact industrial-meets-modern-farmhouse style.

 
 
Kallista launched its Juxtaposed semiprofessional kitchen faucet line, shown here. Available now, it comes in polished chrome, matte black and stainless steel.
 
 
Bocchi updated its Maggiore faucet, shown here, with new features and higher-quality parts.
 
 
Brizo’s Odin semiprofessional kitchen faucet will be available in several finishes, including Brilliance Polished Nickel, shown here.
 
 
3. Touch, Touchless and Other Tech Features


There’s been a lot of innovation in recent years in integrated tech features for faucets. It’s been a gradual progression and one that’s still getting a feel for what homeowners want.

Brizo’s new Tulham line, shown here, features the brand’s SmartTouch technology, which lets a user tap the spout to turn the water on and off. There’s also an LED light that changes color to indicate water temperature.

 
 
Delta’s new Monrovia collection will feature similar technology. You can tap anywhere on the spout or handle. And it doesn’t have to be with wet or grimy fingertips. Use the back of your hand, a forearm or an elbow to tap and activate or deactivate the flow of water. The temperature and flow will be where you last positioned the handle.
 
 
Moen’s new Cia collection offers several hands-free functions. Tap to turn the water on and off. Or motion forward to turn it on; wave left to turn the water warm; wave right to turn it cold; motion forward to turn it off. You can also connect the faucet to an Amazon Alexa or Google Home to issue voice commands, such as “Alexa, tell Moen to give me a cup of water.”
 
 
In fact, Moen is so confident in its wave and voice command technology, it’s coming out with a completely handle-less style, shown here, for homeowners who are ready to go all in on touchless tech.
 
 
Moen’s new Haelyn pull-down kitchen faucet will feature new ColorCue technology that features an LED ring around the nozzle dock that indicates water temperature in five ranges. Blue indicates cold below 81 degrees Fahrenheit. Purple is warm, between 91 and 100 degrees; red is hot, above 109 degrees.
 
 
4. Mixing Finishes


One popular faucet trend emerging in recent years is the mixing of finishes and materials. This was initially rendered as dramatically contrasting finishes, such as Kohler’s black-and-gold bathroom faucet featured below. But some manufacturers are taking a more subtle approach.

Brizo’s new Tulham line, for example, features a tone-on-tone effect. The example shown here displays a mostly matte black finish with levers and bands in Brizo’s Brilliance Onyx Black finish.

 
 
Here’s a one-handle style in Brizo’s Tulham collection, with luxe gold banded with polished gold.
 
 
Brizo’s Odin semiprofessional kitchen faucet mentioned earlier also comes in a polished nickel finish with a wood handle option.
 
Bathroom

5. Lever Handles


It’s hard to deny the abundance of widespread lever handle designs in new bathroom faucet products. And it’s interesting to see all the various interpretations of levers that manufacturers have dreamed up.

Brizo’s new Allaria collection, available in summer 2022, features a widespread lavatory faucet with lever handles that resemble twisted ribbon.

 
Another option in the same collection features square handles that are a cross between levers and knobs.


The style shown here mixes matte black and Brilliance Black Onyx finishes.

 
 
6. Wheel Knobs


Similar to new commercial-style kitchen faucets, these are another result of manufacturers looking to modernize industrial-style plumbing fixtures. Wheel knobs were found on many of the first plumbing parts and are still used in many commercial applications. Several manufacturers picked up on that detail and introduced elegant takes on wheel knob designs.

Brizo released the Litze widespread lavatory faucet with wheel handles, shown here in Brilliance Polished Nickel.

Delta expanded its popular Trinsic collection to include wheel handles, shown here.
 
 
Here’s a single-handle version of Delta’s wheel handle design in its expanded Trinsic collection.
 
 
7. Contrasting Finishes and Materials


As with kitchens, manufacturers are mixing materials and finishes in bathroom faucet designs.

Brizo’s new Allaria bath collection features a clear lever option, shown here with a luxe gold finish.

 
 
Here’s an Allaria wall-mounted faucet with a clear square handle contrasted against polished chrome.
 
 
Kohler’s new Tone collection consists of five faucet options; there are shower and sink faucets and accessories for a coordinated look. The collection comes in six finishes, including two two-tone options: matte black with polished chrome and, shown here, matte black with Brushed Moderne Brass.
 
 
Wood is an increasingly popular detail to integrate into faucets. Brizo expanded its Jason Wu collaboration to bathroom faucets last year. Its widespread lavatory faucet is shown here in matte black with wood cross handles.
 
 
Brizo’s Litze bathroom expansion now features an option with teak wood handles, shown here with polished chrome.
 
 
And Brizo’s Frank Lloyd Wright collection, launched in 2021, includes this single-handle faucet in teak and Luxe Nickel finish.
 
8. Single-Handle Designs


Speaking of single-handle faucets, many manufacturers are releasing new collections in a single-handle design. Some homeowners find that this style saves countertop space and is easier to clean around than, say, a widespread design.

Delta launched Saylor, shown here, a transitional-style design with a geometric spout, gently flared base and subtle industrial-style-inspired handle.

 
 
In addition to the pull-down kitchen faucet shown above, Peerless’ new Flute collection,  features a single-handle lavatory faucet, shown here in chrome.
 
 
Riobel’s new Ode faucet features a cylindrical base and rectangular spout that are easy to wipe clean.
 
 
Moen announced the expansion of its Dartmoor faucet collection to include a new single-handle design, shown here. It features a gently flared spout and sculpted handle with finial detailing.
 
 
9. Traditional and Vintage Styles


While transitional styles certainly dominate a lot of the new faucet collections, some manufacturers are expanding their more traditional-leaning offerings.

Kohler extended its Riff kitchen collection into the bathroom. The company says the elegant, sturdy look is inspired by French Creole and Spanish Colonial architecture.

 
 
Rohl’s new Apothecary line is meant to complement traditional and vintage pieces, such as ornate gilded mirrors and antique vanities.
 
 
The Apothecary faucet features handles and bases with elegant chamfering details that resemble antique medicine or perfume bottles.
 
 
10. Water Monitoring


A lot of attention gets placed on the look of a faucet, but a growing area of interest is on water conservation and usage monitoring.

Moen’s Smart Water Network lets homeowners control and monitor their water usage to conserve as needed. It can also detect leaks and notify you. If you’re away on vacation, you can remotely shut the water off and flush the pipes to prevent bacterial contamination or freezing in the winter.

Kohler’s H2Wise system performs functions similar to Moen’s Smart Water Network. It also features AI capabilities that learn your water use over time so you can make more informed decisions.

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If you’re planning to sell this year, you’re probably thinking about what you’ll need to do to get your house ready to appeal to the most buyers. It’s crucial to work with a trusted real estate professional who knows your local market to get your home ready to sell. But there are a few things you should consider when deciding what to renovate and update before listing this season. Here are three things to keep top of mind as you’re making your list of projects to tackle this year.

1. Available Home Inventory Is Historically Low

Housing inventory sits far below what is normally considered a balanced market. In fact, according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR), the latest data indicates inventory is hitting an all-time low. Because there’s such a limited supply of homes available for sale, you’re in a unique position when you sell your house to benefit from multiple offers and a quick process.


But you want to do so while buyers are still scooping homes up as fast as they’re being listed. Spending time and money on renovations before you sell could mean you’ll miss your key window of opportunity. Of course, certain repairs may be important or even necessary. The best way to determine where to spend your time – and your money – is to work with a real estate advisor to confirm which improvements are truly needed and which ones aren’t likely to be deal-breakers for buyers.


2. Consider Selling Your Home AS-IS With No Renovation or Repairs


Today, many buyers are more willing to take on home improvement projects themselves to get the house they’re after, even if it means putting in a little extra work. A recent survey from Freddie Mac finds that:

“. . . nearly two-in-five potential homebuyers would consider purchasing a home requiring renovations.”

If more buyers are willing to tackle repairs on their own, it may be wise to let the future homeowners remodel the bathroom or the kitchen to make design decisions that are best for their specific taste and lifestyle. Depending on the structural condition of your house, your efforts may be better spent working on small cosmetic updates, like refreshing some paint and power washing the exterior to make sure the home stands out. Instead of over-investing in upgrades, the buyer may change anyway, work with a real estate professional to determine the key projects to tackle that will give you the greatest return on your investment.

3. I Can Help You Spotlight the Upgrades You’ve Made

Over the past year, many people made a significant number of updates to their homes. The most recent State of Home Spending report finds:

“Home improvement spending rose 25% year-over-year to $10,341. Homeowners who invested in home improvement did an average of 3.7 projects, up from 2.7 in 2020, . . .”


With more homeowners taking on more projects in the past 12 months, there’s a good chance you’ve already made updates to your home that could appeal to buyers. If that’s the case, your real estate advisor will find ways to highlight those upgrades in your listing.


The same is true for any projects you invest in moving forward. No matter what, before you renovate, contact a local real estate professional for expert advice on what work needs to be done and how to make it as appealing as possible to future buyers. Every home is different, so a conversation with your agent is mission-critical to make sure you make the right moves when selling this season.

Bottom Line

In today’s sellers’ market, it’s important to spend your time and money wisely when you’re getting ready to move. When you work with me, you'll know exactly where to target your efforts before you list.

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Follow these seven strategies to get the most financial gain on your kitchen remodel.

Homeowners spend more money on kitchen remodeling than on any other home improvement project. And with good reason: Kitchens are the hub of home life and a source of pride.

A significant portion of kitchen remodeling costs may be recovered by the value the project brings to your home. A complete kitchen renovation with a national median cost of $60,000 recovers about 67% of the initial project cost at the home’s resale, according to the “2015 Remodeling Impact Report” from the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®.

The project gets a big thumbs-up from homeowners, too. Those polled in the “Report” gave their new kitchen a Joy Score of 9.8 — a rating based on those who said they were happy or satisfied with their remodeling, with 10 being the highest rating and 1 the lowest.

To maximize your return on investment, follow these seven strategies to keep you on budget and help you make smart choices.

1. PLAN, PLAN, PLAN

Planning your kitchen remodel should take more time than the actual construction. If you plan well, the amount of time you’re inconvenienced by construction mayhem will be minimized. Plus, you’re more likely to stay on budget. How much time should you spend planning? The National Kitchen and Bath Association recommends at least six months. That way, you won’t be tempted to change your mind during construction and create change orders, which will inflate construction costs and hurt your return on investment.

SOME TIPS ON PLANNING:
Study your existing kitchen: How wide is the doorway into your kitchen? It’s a common mistake many homeowners make: Buying the extra-large fridge only to find they can’t get it in the doorway. To avoid mistakes like this, create a drawing of your kitchen with measurements for doorways, walkways, counters, etc. And don’t forget height, too.

Think about traffic patterns: Work aisles should be a minimum of 42 inches wide and at least 48 inches wide for households with multiple cooks.

Design with ergonomics in mind: Drawers or pull-out shelves in base cabinets; counter heights that can adjust up or down; a wall oven instead of a range: These are all features that make a kitchen accessible to everyone — and a pleasure to work in.

Plan for the unforeseeable: Even if you’ve planned down to the number of nails you’ll need in your remodel, expect the unexpected. Build in a little leeway for completing the remodel. Want it done by Thanksgiving? Then plan to be done before Halloween.

Choose all your fixtures and materials before starting: Contractors will be able to make more accurate bids, and you’ll lessen the risk of delays because of back orders.

Don’t be afraid to seek help: A professional designer can simplify your kitchen remodel. Pros help make style decisions, foresee potential problems, and schedule contractors. Expect fees around $50 to $150 per hour, or 5% to 15% of the total cost of the project.

2. KEEP THE SAME FOOTPRINT

Nothing will drive up the cost of a remodel faster than changing the location of plumbing pipes and electrical outlets, and knocking down walls. This is usually where unforeseen problems occur.

So if possible, keep appliances, water fixtures, and walls in the same location. Not only will you save on demolition and reconstruction costs, you’ll cut the amount of dust and debris your project generates.

3. GET REAL ABOUT APPLIANCES

It’s easy to get carried away when planning your new kitchen. A six-burner commercial-grade range and luxury-brand refrigerator may make eye-catching centerpieces, but they may not fit your cooking needs or lifestyle.

Appliances are essentially tools used to cook and store food. Your kitchen remodel shouldn’t be about the tools, but the design and functionality of the entire kitchen.

So unless you’re an exceptional cook who cooks a lot, concentrate your dollars on long-term features that add value, such as cabinets and flooring.

Then choose appliances made by trusted brands that have high marks in online reviews and Consumer Reports.

4. DON'T UNDERESTIMATE THE POWER OF LIGHTING

Lighting can make a world of difference in a kitchen. It can make it look larger and brighter. And it will help you work safely and efficiently. You should have two different types of lighting in your kitchen:

Task Lighting: Under-cabinet lighting should be on your must-do list, since cabinets create such dark work areas. And since you’re remodeling, there won’t be a better time to hard-wire your lights. (Here’s more about under-cabinet lights.) Plan for at least two fixtures per task area to eliminate shadows. Pendant lights are good for islands and other counters without low cabinets. Recessed lights and track lights work well over sinks and general prep areas with no cabinets overhead.

Ambient lighting: Flush-mounted ceiling fixtures, wall sconces, and track lights create overall lighting in your kitchen. Include dimmer switches to control intensity and mood.

5. BE QUALITY-CONSCIOUS

Functionality and durability should be top priorities during kitchen remodeling. Resist low-quality bargains, and choose products that combine low maintenance with long warranty periods. Solid-surface countertops, for instance, may cost a little more, but with the proper care, they’ll look great for a long time.

And if you’re planning on moving soon, products with substantial warranties are a selling advantage.

6. ADD STORAGE, NOT SPACE

Storage will never go out of style, but if you’re sticking with the same footprint, here are a couple of ideas to add more:

Install cabinets that reach the ceiling: They may cost more — and you might need a stepladder — but you’ll gain valuable storage space for Christmas platters and other once-a-year items. In addition, you won’t have to dust cabinet tops.

Hang it up: Mount small shelving units on unused wall areas and inside cabinet doors; hang stock pots and large skillets on a ceiling-mounted rack; and add hooks to the backs of closet doors for aprons, brooms, and mops.

7. COMMUNICATE CLEARLY WITH OUR REMODLERS

Establishing a good rapport with your project manager or construction team is essential for staying on budget. To keep the sweetness in your project:

by the project during work hours: Your presence broadcasts your commitment to quality.

Establish a communication routine: Hang a message board on site where you and the project manager can leave daily communiqués. Give your email address and cell phone number to subs and team leaders.

Set house rules: Be clear about smoking, boom box noise levels, available bathrooms, and appropriate parking.

Be kind: Offer refreshments (a little hospitality can go a long way), give praise when warranted, and resist pestering them with conversation, jokes, and questions when they are working. They’ll work better when refreshed and allowed to concentrate on work.

If you have questions on this, or any other article, please Contact Me today. (949) 929-2270.
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